Wood Mouse

I noticed this Wood Mouse was regularly using the same hole, so getting the photo was simply a case of leaving the camera pre-focussed near the hole, and watching from a distance for the mouse to move in to position before firing the shutter remotely. The Wood Mouse is our most common and widespread wild rodent. It is an inhabitant mainly of woodland and fields but is highly adaptable and is found in most habitats if not too wet. It is rarely recorded on higher exposed ground with little cover. Wood mice are essentially nocturnal but some individuals may venture out in daylight.


Another shot of one of our local speciality species, the Hawfinch. You can often find them in deciduous mature woodland with large trees, they prefer Cherry, Beech and Hornbeam. They are difficult to see, as they are shy and very well hidden in the undergrowth, if you approach with great care, you may see them feeding, but the least movement will disturb them, and off they go. You can see Hawfinches all year round; usually more easily seen outside the breeding season when trees are leafless and they feed more regularly on the ground.

European Nightjar

With the end of the Nightjar season fast approaching, this was probably my favourite shot of the year, though I still have a number of images and hours of footage to work through. They’re fascinating birds, each an individual in their own way, and constantly raise questions the more they’re studied. This is the same female bird that featured in the footage from the nest-cam that I recently posted. The following picture was taken from a different site, also in the Forest of Dean, and shows a male perched whilst singing.